Cluss in the News

News from Franklin School in Washington D.C.

After years of an uncertain future, a wonderful solution for the Franklin School has been found: It will be developed as a museum and education center for the arts.

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News from Franklin School in Washington D.C.

After years of an uncertain future, a wonderful solution for the Franklin School has been found: It will be developed as a museum and education center for the arts. More information: Washington Business Journal, Feb 3, 2014

 

Franklin School in 2005

 

(No) News from the Arts an Industries Building in Washington D.C.

Renovations on AIB in April 2011

Since 2004, the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building (National Museum) has been closed for renovations. In January 2014, the Smithsonian Institution announced that the building will remain closed for the foreseeable future.

Article in the Washington Post, January 28, 2014

 

Previously Unknown Cluss Buildings Found

In 2009, researchers have discovered ten buildings designed by Adolf Cluss that were not previously known. One of the ten is still standing. A total of 89 buildings designed by Cluss, often working with partners, have now been identified.

Discovered in June 2010, the Metropolitan Hook and Ladder Company?s Fire Engine House (108) is one of eleven buildings that Cluss designed that still stands, and the very first one of his buildings to be completed (dedicated in February 1864).

Newspaper articles about eight previously unknown buildings have been discovered by John Richardson, who is working on a biography of Alexander R. Shepherd. Three of the buildings were commercial or combination commercial and residential establishments in Southwest Washington: the Joseph P. Herman Store and Residence (96), the Samuel Herman Stores and Residences (97), and the Wolford and Shilberg Store (98). Both Joseph and Samuel Herman emigrated about 1855 from Hesse-Darmstadt.

For the United States Coast Survey (99) Cluss planned four brick buildings on Capitol Hill between New Jersey Avenue and South Capitol Street SE in 1870-71. John Cloud of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration found copies of Cluss?s drawings of the Coast Survey complex in the NOAA Library.

In 1872, the Board of Public Works ordered Cluss to design a Smallpox Hospital (100) at 1900 Massachusetts Avenue SE.

Richardson also discovered evidence of three residential buildings: The William F. Mattingly and Michael W. Beveridge Residences (101), a duplex at 1616 and 1618 H Street NW; the John K. Wills Residences (102), a duplex at 1013 and 1015 Fourteenth Street NW, and the General Noah L. Jeffries Residence (103), 1505 K Street NW.

The Ladies Relief Society of St. Aloysius Roman Catholic Church commissioned Cluss to design a residence for women 'of reduced circumstance.' The St. Aloysius Church Industrial Home for Women (104) stood at the northeast corner of K and North Capitol Streets NE.

In 1864, the City of Washington commissioned Cluss and Kammerhueber to design a two-story market building at Center Market (109), a brick structure facing Pennsylvania Avenue that would provide a link between two frame buildings that faced 7th and 9th streets.

All of the newly-discovered buildings were designed in the 1860s and early 1870s.

 

 

 

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